You're an Educated, Informed, and Thoughtful Working Mom--Why do you need a Doula?

You decided to get an education and your career up and running.

Maybe you waited to get married because you wanted to take your time finding the right partner. You wanted to make the best choice, not the fastest.

Or maybe you married young and wanted to travel for a few years and enjoy life before kids.

Maybe you chose NOT to get married because all you need is your bad ass self.

Maybe you tried for three years to conceive and only now are carrying a rainbow baby.

Maybe you finally brought home a beautiful baby you carried in your heart but not your body.

Either way, here you are (maybe) pregnant and giddy to meet your child. There's so much you want to show him or her, so many snuggles to relish, baby head smells to inhale. You are ready to spend time with your newborn and haven't really thought about what the postpartum time might look like outside of newborn care. Where do those new minutes really go?

Or maybe you feel overwhelmed as a first time mom. You don't know how someone becomes a mom and returns to work like a huge transformation didn't just take place.

How can a doula can help you?

Even though you might not realize it yet

Before baby you were living a delicate balance between working and living for yourself, maybe a dog or cat and spouse. Now you have a new human to live for and with. It's a full time job to feed, diaper, rock a baby AND still take care of yourself! That's where we come in. We can give you piece of mind and balance.

A doula can

  • Help you with chores so you don't feel like your house is falling a part all around you.

  • help you learn how to use that pump so you're knowledgeable and prepared for your return to work.

  • Help you come up with a new schedule now that your whole life has changed.

  • Give you valuable time to sleep

  • Prepare you a few meals and fold your laundry

How is Rae different?

I know better than to assume all working moms want the same thing. I don't come into your home, checklist in hand, without first working with you on what you want our time together to look like. The postpartum care I provide is customized to your needs and desires. That means if you just want me to show you how to wear baby to the grocery store, I'm on it. If you just want me to facilitate a family visit with folks you don't want to touch the baby, I'm on it.

Most importantly, you don't get just any surprise doula sent to you from an agency. You get Rae Jager. every. single. time.

And then you know what? You return to work stronger, ready, and so grateful for the time you got to spend with baby and not getting bogged down in all the chores you hate!

Calming an Upset Baby

Dr. Karp was onto something when he came up with the 5 S’s. For those of you that don’t know Dr. Karp or the tactics he uses to calm babies, you might want to read or watch, “Happiest Baby on the Block.” Here’s the summary: When baby is upset, try the 5 S's.

The 5 S’s

This baby is swaddled, swung, shh-ed, and on her side. All she’s missing is a pacifier. She was instantly calmed.

This baby is swaddled, swung, shh-ed, and on her side. All she’s missing is a pacifier. She was instantly calmed.

  • Swaddle- Help baby feel hugged, warm, and safe by swaddling them up.

  • Side- Hold baby on their side to help prevent arm flailing.

  • Swing (or any rhythmic movement will work)-If baby is very upset, you’ll want to swing them more vigorously until they’re able to calm down a bit, then continue a moderate, calming swing back and forth. Baby was moving inside a body for a long time. They crave this motion.

  • Suck- Babies are born wanting to suck. You can nurse baby or pop in a pacifier (research says nipple confusion isn’t as common as people say).

  • Shhhhh- It is LOUD inside mom’s body—blood is moving, a heart is beating, food is digesting, there's mysterious popping and gurgling. Babies are used to this orchestra. White noise, of any kind (and you’ll learn quickly what baby prefers—vacuum or washing machine) helps settle baby.

Of course it’s important to make sure that baby isn’t crying because he or she is hungry, has a wet diaper, or is overly tired. In those instances, it’s important to meet baby’s immediate needs.


Sometimes those 5 S’s don’t work on their own.

Think about being inside a body for 9 or 10 months and then suddenly being cast out into a bright and loud world. It’s startling, scary, and newborns need some extra love to settle after being worked up in a big way. When the 5 S’s don’t work, what can you do?

Magical Hold - I can’t even explain what’s happening here. It’s genius. Just watch below.

fussy baby hold

Fussy Baby Hold- This is what it looks like to your left. A little pressure on baby’s belly helps, in addition to them feeling like they’re suspended once again in mom’s womb.

Go Outside- A change in scenery does wonders. It doesn’t matter if it’s cold or hot (though cold weather is preferred, we can’t control nature)—taking baby outside resets them.

It does take some time to learn what comfort measures newborns prefer. When one tactic doesn’t work, try another.

Additionally, newborns change every single day. What works one day, might not work the next.

If the crying ever becomes too much—set baby down somewhere safe—and step away for a few moments to breathe. Try again. The newborn stage doesn’t last forever, and though it’s difficult now, it does get easier.

What should my baby sleep in?

How many layers are too much? What should baby sleep in when it’s summer versus winter? Questions the best of us are too ashamed to ask and have ended up Googling at 2am.

You might have heard to dress a baby in whatever you are wearing plus one more layer. To me this saying is hard to unpack. I find it easier to dress a baby according to temperature, and the visual below, from Sleeperific.com, has been immensely helpful.

First, let me define what a tog is because you might have caught a glimpse of the word below and are scratching your head.

A tog is how we rate warmth for baby clothes. The lower the tog, the thinner the material. The higher the tog, the thicker the material.

Depending on the temperature you keep your home (and the recommendation varies, but it’s usually between 68-72 degrees), you can dress your baby at night according to this.

If after following the tog recommendations, you are still uncertain or worried about baby’s comfort, you can feel baby’s chest and the back of his or her neck. If the skin is warm and clammy to the touch, remove a layer. If the skin feels cold at all, add a layer. With that being said, do not worry if baby’s hand or feet are cold to the touch, baby’s don’t have the best circulation when they first make their appearance into the world. It’s our job to help regulate their body temperatures.

Remember there is no steadfast rule to dressing a baby for sleep. The recommendations above are just that, recommendations. Some babies run hot, some cold. If you're concerned, give the doctor a call!

Lastly, never put a baby to sleep in a hat (unless of course, you are camping out in the cold).

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