Paced Bottle Feeding

Many mothers return to work after 3 months. returning to work doesn't have to hinder the breastfeeding relationship. One of the best ways to continue breastfeeding and ensure that your baby is able to take a bottle while you're away, is to teach your infant how to pace bottle feed. This is a style of bottle feeding that mimics breastfeeding. It's actually very simple to do, and below I will put a video.

Before having bottle in hand, there are a few things to keep in mind.

Introduce a bottle at around 6 weeks.

Timing is everything.

Waiting too long to introduce a bottle sometimes results in baby being unwilling to take one.

Choose a slow-flow nipple

That is a newborn nipple, size 1, or even a preemie nipple.

Sit baby upright during feeding, instead of laying down.

With paced bottle feeding, babies are actually active participants. We have to watch them closely to see their feeding cues. Sitting them upright slows the flow of milk and encourages baby to suck harder.

Take frequent breaks to burp baby

What we know from observing babies is they don't instantly get milk. Babies suck for a good while before a let down. Additionally, milk does not flow the entire time during a feed. Our breasts empty a bit, then another let down is signaled. To mimic this, let baby suck for a few seconds before allowing the nipple to fill with milk. During the feed, allow for plenty of time to burp that air out!

Switch sides like you would on the breast

Moving baby to your other knee not only mimic breastfeeding, it also helps develope baby's neck and eye muscles, as they learn to look at you from the other side of your body.

Want to see paced bottle feeding in action? Watch below.

How much do I feed my baby the first year?

In short, a baby relies on milk from mother or formula for the entire first year of his or her life.

A baby gets almost all of its nutrients from the milk alone. Though most introduce solid foods at 6 months, food before one is just for fun.

A baby is not very successful or interested in eating enough of a variety to get the nutrients they need.

Because of the importance of these nutrients for a baby's growing body and brain, I have provided a helpful chart below to guide you and how much milk consumption baby needs throughout the first year.

Overall, how much milk a baby drinks, depends on growth and age, but having a guideline is helpful.

Every baby is different and remember, because formula takes longer to digest and has less fat, a baby usually drinks more volume than breastmilk. It's not uncommon for a 9month old baby to drink 4 oz of breastmilk at a feeding and that same baby to drink 7oz of formula.

As always, consult with a lactation consultant or doctor if you have any concerns!

Feeding newborn baby through first year

What should my baby sleep in?

How many layers are too much? What should baby sleep in when it’s summer versus winter? Questions the best of us are too ashamed to ask and have ended up Googling at 2am.

You might have heard to dress a baby in whatever you are wearing plus one more layer. To me this saying is hard to unpack. I find it easier to dress a baby according to temperature, and the visual below, from Sleeperific.com, has been immensely helpful.

First, let me define what a tog is because you might have caught a glimpse of the word below and are scratching your head.

A tog is how we rate warmth for baby clothes. The lower the tog, the thinner the material. The higher the tog, the thicker the material.

Depending on the temperature you keep your home (and the recommendation varies, but it’s usually between 68-72 degrees), you can dress your baby at night according to this.

If after following the tog recommendations, you are still uncertain or worried about baby’s comfort, you can feel baby’s chest and the back of his or her neck. If the skin is warm and clammy to the touch, remove a layer. If the skin feels cold at all, add a layer. With that being said, do not worry if baby’s hand or feet are cold to the touch, baby’s don’t have the best circulation when they first make their appearance into the world. It’s our job to help regulate their body temperatures.

Remember there is no steadfast rule to dressing a baby for sleep. The recommendations above are just that, recommendations. Some babies run hot, some cold. If you're concerned, give the doctor a call!

Lastly, never put a baby to sleep in a hat (unless of course, you are camping out in the cold).

BabyClothingSleep1-708x1024.png