What should my baby sleep in?

How many layers are too much? What should baby sleep in when it’s summer versus winter? Questions the best of us are too ashamed to ask and have ended up Googling at 2am.

You might have heard to dress a baby in whatever you are wearing plus one more layer. To me this saying is hard to unpack. I find it easier to dress a baby according to temperature, and the visual below, from Sleeperific.com, has been immensely helpful.

First, let me define what a tog is because you might have caught a glimpse of the word below and are scratching your head.

A tog is how we rate warmth for baby clothes. The lower the tog, the thinner the material. The higher the tog, the thicker the material.

Depending on the temperature you keep your home (and the recommendation varies, but it’s usually between 68-72 degrees), you can dress your baby at night according to this.

If after following the tog recommendations, you are still uncertain or worried about baby’s comfort, you can feel baby’s chest and the back of his or her neck. If the skin is warm and clammy to the touch, remove a layer. If the skin feels cold at all, add a layer. With that being said, do not worry if baby’s hand or feet are cold to the touch, baby’s don’t have the best circulation when they first make their appearance into the world. It’s our job to help regulate their body temperatures.

Remember there is no steadfast rule to dressing a baby for sleep. The recommendations above are just that, recommendations. Some babies run hot, some cold. If you're concerned, give the doctor a call!

Lastly, never put a baby to sleep in a hat (unless of course, you are camping out in the cold).

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