You're an Educated, Informed, and Thoughtful Working Mom--Why do you need a Doula?

You decided to get an education and your career up and running.

Maybe you waited to get married because you wanted to take your time finding the right partner. You wanted to make the best choice, not the fastest.

Or maybe you married young and wanted to travel for a few years and enjoy life before kids.

Maybe you chose NOT to get married because all you need is your bad ass self.

Maybe you tried for three years to conceive and only now are carrying a rainbow baby.

Maybe you finally brought home a beautiful baby you carried in your heart but not your body.

Either way, here you are (maybe) pregnant and giddy to meet your child. There's so much you want to show him or her, so many snuggles to relish, baby head smells to inhale. You are ready to spend time with your newborn and haven't really thought about what the postpartum time might look like outside of newborn care. Where do those new minutes really go?

Or maybe you feel overwhelmed as a first time mom. You don't know how someone becomes a mom and returns to work like a huge transformation didn't just take place.

How can a doula can help you?

Even though you might not realize it yet

Before baby you were living a delicate balance between working and living for yourself, maybe a dog or cat and spouse. Now you have a new human to live for and with. It's a full time job to feed, diaper, rock a baby AND still take care of yourself! That's where we come in. We can give you piece of mind and balance.

A doula can

  • Help you with chores so you don't feel like your house is falling a part all around you.

  • help you learn how to use that pump so you're knowledgeable and prepared for your return to work.

  • Help you come up with a new schedule now that your whole life has changed.

  • Give you valuable time to sleep

  • Prepare you a few meals and fold your laundry

How is Rae different?

I know better than to assume all working moms want the same thing. I don't come into your home, checklist in hand, without first working with you on what you want our time together to look like. The postpartum care I provide is customized to your needs and desires. That means if you just want me to show you how to wear baby to the grocery store, I'm on it. If you just want me to facilitate a family visit with folks you don't want to touch the baby, I'm on it.

Most importantly, you don't get just any surprise doula sent to you from an agency. You get Rae Jager. every. single. time.

And then you know what? You return to work stronger, ready, and so grateful for the time you got to spend with baby and not getting bogged down in all the chores you hate!

Paced Bottle Feeding

Many mothers return to work after 3 months. returning to work doesn't have to hinder the breastfeeding relationship. One of the best ways to continue breastfeeding and ensure that your baby is able to take a bottle while you're away, is to teach your infant how to pace bottle feed. This is a style of bottle feeding that mimics breastfeeding. It's actually very simple to do, and below I will put a video.

Before having bottle in hand, there are a few things to keep in mind.

Introduce a bottle at around 6 weeks.

Timing is everything.

Waiting too long to introduce a bottle sometimes results in baby being unwilling to take one.

Choose a slow-flow nipple

That is a newborn nipple, size 1, or even a preemie nipple.

Sit baby upright during feeding, instead of laying down.

With paced bottle feeding, babies are actually active participants. We have to watch them closely to see their feeding cues. Sitting them upright slows the flow of milk and encourages baby to suck harder.

Take frequent breaks to burp baby

What we know from observing babies is they don't instantly get milk. Babies suck for a good while before a let down. Additionally, milk does not flow the entire time during a feed. Our breasts empty a bit, then another let down is signaled. To mimic this, let baby suck for a few seconds before allowing the nipple to fill with milk. During the feed, allow for plenty of time to burp that air out!

Switch sides like you would on the breast

Moving baby to your other knee not only mimic breastfeeding, it also helps develope baby's neck and eye muscles, as they learn to look at you from the other side of your body.

Want to see paced bottle feeding in action? Watch below.

How much do I feed my baby the first year?

In short, a baby relies on milk from mother or formula for the entire first year of his or her life.

A baby gets almost all of its nutrients from the milk alone. Though most introduce solid foods at 6 months, food before one is just for fun.

A baby is not very successful or interested in eating enough of a variety to get the nutrients they need.

Because of the importance of these nutrients for a baby's growing body and brain, I have provided a helpful chart below to guide you and how much milk consumption baby needs throughout the first year.

Overall, how much milk a baby drinks, depends on growth and age, but having a guideline is helpful.

Every baby is different and remember, because formula takes longer to digest and has less fat, a baby usually drinks more volume than breastmilk. It's not uncommon for a 9month old baby to drink 4 oz of breastmilk at a feeding and that same baby to drink 7oz of formula.

As always, consult with a lactation consultant or doctor if you have any concerns!

Feeding newborn baby through first year