How much do I feed my baby the first year?

In short, a baby relies on milk from mother or formula for the entire first year of his or her life.

A baby gets almost all of its nutrients from the milk alone. Though most introduce solid foods at 6 months, food before one is just for fun.

A baby is not very successful or interested in eating enough of a variety to get the nutrients they need.

Because of the importance of these nutrients for a baby's growing body and brain, I have provided a helpful chart below to guide you and how much milk consumption baby needs throughout the first year.

Overall, how much milk a baby drinks, depends on growth and age, but having a guideline is helpful.

Every baby is different and remember, because formula takes longer to digest and has less fat, a baby usually drinks more volume than breastmilk. It's not uncommon for a 9month old baby to drink 4 oz of breastmilk at a feeding and that same baby to drink 7oz of formula.

As always, consult with a lactation consultant or doctor if you have any concerns!

Feeding newborn baby through first year

Small Business Tuesday-

Talking about babies is heavy.

Sometimes you just want to relax and not be a human pacifier and/or diaper changer on duty 24/7.

One of the ways to do that is get a facial. This was the best decision I made after Ivy was born, and I met with a talented and passionate skincare specialist just outside of Cincinnati.

Meet Al Kirkendol, an esthetician (skincare specialist) at 501 Spa in Bellevue, KY. She believes in the importance of taking care of our skin.

Our skin is the second-most complex organ of the body, being surpassed only by the brain. Let’s honor our skin by taking care of it.

If you’ve never had a facial before, I’ll give you a run down. Al first meets with you to discuss your skin goals. She assess what products will be the best for your skin type (even super sensitive skin), and gives you a run down of what she plans on doing in the time you booked. A jade roller, a few hot towels, lots of botanical smelling creams tailored to your skin type, and a scalp massage later, you walk away with really soft, clear skin. It's a great way to reset. Additionally, Al can help you improve your skin outside of the spa by helping adjust and refine your skincare routine.

You can book her here.

And follow her on Instagram @al.kirkendol.

Al Kirkendol

Al Kirkendol

What should my baby sleep in?

How many layers are too much? What should baby sleep in when it’s summer versus winter? Questions the best of us are too ashamed to ask and have ended up Googling at 2am.

You might have heard to dress a baby in whatever you are wearing plus one more layer. To me this saying is hard to unpack. I find it easier to dress a baby according to temperature, and the visual below, from Sleeperific.com, has been immensely helpful.

First, let me define what a tog is because you might have caught a glimpse of the word below and are scratching your head.

A tog is how we rate warmth for baby clothes. The lower the tog, the thinner the material. The higher the tog, the thicker the material.

Depending on the temperature you keep your home (and the recommendation varies, but it’s usually between 68-72 degrees), you can dress your baby at night according to this.

If after following the tog recommendations, you are still uncertain or worried about baby’s comfort, you can feel baby’s chest and the back of his or her neck. If the skin is warm and clammy to the touch, remove a layer. If the skin feels cold at all, add a layer. With that being said, do not worry if baby’s hand or feet are cold to the touch, baby’s don’t have the best circulation when they first make their appearance into the world. It’s our job to help regulate their body temperatures.

Remember there is no steadfast rule to dressing a baby for sleep. The recommendations above are just that, recommendations. Some babies run hot, some cold. If you're concerned, give the doctor a call!

Lastly, never put a baby to sleep in a hat (unless of course, you are camping out in the cold).

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